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9780241705384 6668451ff02f04a08a71b803 The Tale Of A Wall Reflections On Hope And Freedom https://www.midlandbookshop.com/s/607fe93d7eafcac1f2c73ea4/66684520f02f04a08a71b84d/91zpk5ppjhl-_sy425_.jpg

Review

The Tale of a Wall charts a deeply personal journey through the conflict that has defined Nasser Abu Srour’s life… extraordinary… his humanity shines through, even as he endures an incarceration with no end in sight… his poetic sensibility brings freshness to the telling of the well-rehearsed story of this long-running conflict: we see it anew -- Lydia Wilson - Guardian

Nasser Abu Srour fights for everybody's freedom… thoughtful and honest… The personal and political are tightly entwined… brave… reveals that perhaps love can offer a certain kind of liberation too: a means to rise above the past, the present and possibly the future -- Samir El-Youssef - The Times Literary Supplement

The Tale of a Wall is the reason we have literature. Nasser has made art out of poison with his honesty and golden pen. He brings to light the specificity of experience of the Palestinian prisoner in a manner that makes every reader think about the incarcerated in their own countries without forgetting Palestine. It helps us understand the consequences on others when we do not wield whatever power we each hold for solidarity. A profound and important work -- Sarah Schulman

A stunning book. A poetic and remarkable account of decades of imprisonment and the effect it can have on the mind, body and soul. This is a story of unimaginable loss, but also of survival -- Sally Hayden

Nasser Abu Srour doesn’t allow his long incarceration in an Israeli prison to break his spirit. He turns to the wall of his cell that is intended to confine him into his path to freedom, and in the process, out of the darkness of his cell produces a luminous memoir -- Raja Shehadeh, author of We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir

A unique, lyrical exploration of what his inhumane confinement has taught him about resistance, love, lies, forgiveness, and the complicated struggle for liberation of his fractured, occupied land. Rather than allow the many walls surrounding him from childhood to break him down, he has turned them into darkly luminous companions on a journey into the heart of cruelty and redemption -- Ariel Dorfman, author of The Suicide Museum

Fierce and lyrical, Nasser Abu Srour’s memoir bears witness to struggle and resilience-both his own, and that of the Palestinian people. It’s also a devastating testament to the power of hope, and of its loss -- Claire Messud

In contemplating the meaning of freedom, and the prison walls enclosing him, Nasser Abu Srour has produced a richly emotional and affecting memoir. His poetic prose, lyrically translated by Luke Leafgren, ranges far beyond physical confines to evoke steadfastness and universal human dignity, through the intellectual curiosity of a writer ‘born into a family on the margins, living in a marginal place filled with marginal people.’ Its resonance, and Abu Srour’s vision, are far from marginal -- Matthew Teller, author of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem

An extraordinary memoir. Abu Srour is not just a witness of his personal life but a witness to one of the major tragedies of our times -- Amara Lakhous, author of Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio

Abu Srour's memoir is more than a tale of prison. His unflinching prose reveals a powerful truth: human beings are compelled to tell our stories in order to affirm our existence in an unjust world. Ultimately he captures both the individual and collective spirit of Palestinians who, to this day, continue to resist dispossession, disillusionment, and despair -- Sahar Mustafah

Here, at a historical moment when Palestinian prisoners are again discussed only as a collective political lever, Nass
9780241705384
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The Tale Of A Wall Reflections On Hope And Freedom

The Tale Of A Wall Reflections On Hope And Freedom

ISBN: 9780241705384
₹1,039
₹1,299   (20% OFF)



Details
  • ISBN: 9780241705384
  • Author: Nasser Abu Srour
  • Publisher: Allen Lane
  • Pages: 320
  • Format: Paperback
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Book Description

Review

The Tale of a Wall charts a deeply personal journey through the conflict that has defined Nasser Abu Srour’s life… extraordinary… his humanity shines through, even as he endures an incarceration with no end in sight… his poetic sensibility brings freshness to the telling of the well-rehearsed story of this long-running conflict: we see it anew -- Lydia Wilson - Guardian

Nasser Abu Srour fights for everybody's freedom… thoughtful and honest… The personal and political are tightly entwined… brave… reveals that perhaps love can offer a certain kind of liberation too: a means to rise above the past, the present and possibly the future -- Samir El-Youssef - The Times Literary Supplement

The Tale of a Wall is the reason we have literature. Nasser has made art out of poison with his honesty and golden pen. He brings to light the specificity of experience of the Palestinian prisoner in a manner that makes every reader think about the incarcerated in their own countries without forgetting Palestine. It helps us understand the consequences on others when we do not wield whatever power we each hold for solidarity. A profound and important work -- Sarah Schulman

A stunning book. A poetic and remarkable account of decades of imprisonment and the effect it can have on the mind, body and soul. This is a story of unimaginable loss, but also of survival -- Sally Hayden

Nasser Abu Srour doesn’t allow his long incarceration in an Israeli prison to break his spirit. He turns to the wall of his cell that is intended to confine him into his path to freedom, and in the process, out of the darkness of his cell produces a luminous memoir -- Raja Shehadeh, author of We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir

A unique, lyrical exploration of what his inhumane confinement has taught him about resistance, love, lies, forgiveness, and the complicated struggle for liberation of his fractured, occupied land. Rather than allow the many walls surrounding him from childhood to break him down, he has turned them into darkly luminous companions on a journey into the heart of cruelty and redemption -- Ariel Dorfman, author of The Suicide Museum

Fierce and lyrical, Nasser Abu Srour’s memoir bears witness to struggle and resilience-both his own, and that of the Palestinian people. It’s also a devastating testament to the power of hope, and of its loss -- Claire Messud

In contemplating the meaning of freedom, and the prison walls enclosing him, Nasser Abu Srour has produced a richly emotional and affecting memoir. His poetic prose, lyrically translated by Luke Leafgren, ranges far beyond physical confines to evoke steadfastness and universal human dignity, through the intellectual curiosity of a writer ‘born into a family on the margins, living in a marginal place filled with marginal people.’ Its resonance, and Abu Srour’s vision, are far from marginal -- Matthew Teller, author of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem

An extraordinary memoir. Abu Srour is not just a witness of his personal life but a witness to one of the major tragedies of our times -- Amara Lakhous, author of Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio

Abu Srour's memoir is more than a tale of prison. His unflinching prose reveals a powerful truth: human beings are compelled to tell our stories in order to affirm our existence in an unjust world. Ultimately he captures both the individual and collective spirit of Palestinians who, to this day, continue to resist dispossession, disillusionment, and despair -- Sahar Mustafah

Here, at a historical moment when Palestinian prisoners are again discussed only as a collective political lever, Nass

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