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9781782692843 6139ab0d8a5db45123a15cea Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass https://cdn1.storehippo.com/s/607fe93d7eafcac1f2c73ea4/6139ab0e8a5db45123a15d27/webp/61u6foeukgl-_sx404_bo1-204-203-200_.jpg

A stunningly illustrated back-to-back edition of this one-of-a-kind classic of children's literature

Alice's adventures in the dreamlike worlds of Wonderland and the Looking Glass Kingdom are some of the most original and best-loved children's stories ever written. These joyous, thrilling and utterly nonsensical tales are filled with vivid, unforgettable images and characters.

This edition contains the texts of both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass in a beautiful, clothbound back-to-back edition - illustrated throughout in glorious colour, Floor Rieder's gorgeous drawings are an original and fresh imagining of Alice's topsy-turvy world.

About the Author

Lewis Carroll was the pen name of the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Johnson (1832-1898), who was a mathematician and Oxford academic, wrote works of satire and logic and was a keen photographer. He was also the most famous children's author of his day, celebrated for his Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, as well as his collections of nonsense verse, such as The Hunting of the Snark.

Floor Rieder is a prizewinning illustrator who has illustrated many books including The Mystery of Life by Jan Paul Schutten, for which she was given the Golden Pencil Award in her native Netherlands. Now she has created a new, timeless imagining of Lewis Carroll's Alice.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her
sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or
twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading,
but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what
is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”
So she was considering, in her own mind (as well as she
could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid),
whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth
the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly
a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice
think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say
to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when she
thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought
to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite
natural); but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its
waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice
started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had
never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or
a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran
across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down
a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once
considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some
way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice
had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she
found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for
she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her,
and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried
to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it
was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides
of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards
and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures
hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves
as she passed: it was labeled ORANGE MARMALADE, but to her
great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop
the jar, for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed
to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
“Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such
a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling
down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at
home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it,
even if I fell off the top of the house!” (Which
was very likely true.)
9781782692843
in stockINR 1299
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Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass

ISBN: 9781782692843
₹1,299


Available At: Hauz Khas
Details
  • ISBN: 9781782692843
  • Author: Lewis Carroll and Floor Rieder
  • Publisher: Pushkin Children's Books
  • Pages: 384
  • Format: Paperback

Book Description

A stunningly illustrated back-to-back edition of this one-of-a-kind classic of children's literature

Alice's adventures in the dreamlike worlds of Wonderland and the Looking Glass Kingdom are some of the most original and best-loved children's stories ever written. These joyous, thrilling and utterly nonsensical tales are filled with vivid, unforgettable images and characters.

This edition contains the texts of both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass in a beautiful, clothbound back-to-back edition - illustrated throughout in glorious colour, Floor Rieder's gorgeous drawings are an original and fresh imagining of Alice's topsy-turvy world.

About the Author

Lewis Carroll was the pen name of the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Johnson (1832-1898), who was a mathematician and Oxford academic, wrote works of satire and logic and was a keen photographer. He was also the most famous children's author of his day, celebrated for his Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, as well as his collections of nonsense verse, such as The Hunting of the Snark.

Floor Rieder is a prizewinning illustrator who has illustrated many books including The Mystery of Life by Jan Paul Schutten, for which she was given the Golden Pencil Award in her native Netherlands. Now she has created a new, timeless imagining of Lewis Carroll's Alice.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE
Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her
sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or
twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading,
but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what
is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”
So she was considering, in her own mind (as well as she
could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid),
whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth
the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly
a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice
think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say
to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when she
thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought
to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite
natural); but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its
waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice
started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had
never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or
a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran
across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down
a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once
considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some
way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice
had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she
found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for
she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her,
and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried
to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it
was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides
of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards
and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures
hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves
as she passed: it was labeled ORANGE MARMALADE, but to her
great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop
the jar, for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed
to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
“Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such
a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling
down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at
home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it,
even if I fell off the top of the house!” (Which
was very likely true.)

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